When Drugs Go Digital

Just when you think you’ve seen and heard it all …

I read a story on the Huffington Post yesterday about teenagers getting a high off “digital drugs.” They call it i-Dosing. Here’s how it works: i-Dosers lay motionless with headphones on while listening to binaural sound clips from YouTube for 10-minute periods. This equates to a type of sensory deprivation experienced with other drugs like ecstasy or LSD.

From Wired.com:

“Those who want to get addicted to the “drugs” can purchase tracks that will purportedly bring about the same effects of marijuana, cocaine, opium and peyote. While street drugs rarely come with instruction manuals, potential digital drug users are advised to buy a 40-page guide so that they learn how to properly get high on MP3s.”

Don’t get me wrong — I’m good for a night of boozing now and then, but drugs have never been my thing. I’ve got a healthy fear of consequence, both physical and legal. (Christ, I rarely exceed the speed limit.) While there may not be a chemical element involved, you can’t tell me any of this looks healthy:

The fear is iDosing will act as a gateway drug; the same willingness to experiment with digital drugs could compel kids to try harder drugs with actual physical consequences. I get that. It’s probably no coincidence iDosing terrifies me just as any other drugs does. I’m a prude like that. But if you’re a 15-year-old who gives this a try and it turns out to be sort of fun, what’s to stop you from trying marijuana? Nitrous? Cocaine? Heroin?

These are practical concerns.

For you more adventurous types, I’d love to feature a guest post on what iDosing is all about. This seems to be the clip the kiddies are into. If you’re willing, give it a run and let me know how it goes.

I think I’ll pass.